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Health

Wed
21
Feb

Blood Donor Day held every month

The next local LifeServe Blood Center blood drive will be held Thursday, March 1, from 12-5 p.m., at the First Baptist Church in south Waukon. Blood drives are held every month in Waukon, allowing for more donors to give. LifeServe Blood Center supplies Veterans Memorial Hospital with its blood and blood products.

Anyone who lives to the age of 72 will have a 95% probability of needing blood or blood products at sometime in their life, so blood donors are greatly needed.

Regular blood donors may donate blood as often as every 56 days. First-time donors will find that donating blood is a safe and easy way to save lives and make a difference in the community. One single blood donation can save the lives of up to three sick or injured hospital patients. On average, 90% of first-time donors give at blood drives in their community. This is a great opportunity for first-time donors to see how easy the blood donation process is.

The donation process is simple:

Wed
21
Feb

Health Care Provider CPR to be offered

Veterans Memorial Hospital will be offering a course in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for health care providers (those working in health related fields such as physicians, nurses, EMTs, etc.) Monday, March 12, beginning at 5:30 p.m. This “Health Care Professional” CPR class will be held in the Large Conference Room located on the lower level of the hospital.

The cost of the class, for certification or recertification, is the same, and all registrants should bring along their own pocket mask. The card received with the course does certify attendants in CPR for two years.

Pre-registration plus a minimum of three participants is required. For more information and to register for the “Health Care Provider” CPR Course, call Veterans Memorial Hospital at 563-568-3411.
 

Wed
21
Feb

Memorials received by Veterans Memorial Health Care Foundation

Memorials were recently received by the Veterans Memorial Health Care Foundation in memory of Abigail Osterholm by Blair and Jess Everman, Marv and Marge Strike, Pat Pettingill, George Pickett, David and M. Joy Roslien, Darci Engelhardt, Brad and Judy Herman, Jim and Jill Kiesau, Gordy and Darlene Kaeser, Jr., Jeff and Jane David, Craig and Barb Lensing, Dave and Gail Prestemon, Bob and Joyce Schorg, Gary and Joan David, Lois Evens, Arnie and June Laures, Kay Carter, Marilyn Bulman, Lillian Larson, Gladwin and Darlene Anderson, Jim and Linda Ryan, Angie Schulte, Jane Dietrich, Jerry and Linda Siegrist, Duane Gilbertson and Jill DeBoer, Chuck and Lois Votsmier, Jim and Ele Klenske, the Cerro Gordo County Dept. of Public Health in appreciation of her son, Ron, the Health Department’s Director, and family and friends of Abigail Osterholm.

Wed
14
Feb

Rehabilitation provides a great “tune up” when needed

The Rehabilitation Department at Veterans Memorial Hospital has proven to be a great place to come whenever someone feels they need to “tune up” and regain some strength in their muscle tone, work on better balance or flexibility.

Marshall Kruse is one of those patients. For the past five years, he has been visiting the Rehabilitation department for regular physical and occupational therapy each spring and fall. Marshall experienced a brain injury in 2005 while living in Cedar Falls. After he and his family moved to Lansing, he began having his rehabilitation at Veterans Memorial Hospital. Whenever he feels that he has declined in his abilities, he receives doctor’s orders to attend rehab to work on building his muscles back up and get walking again.

Wed
14
Feb

February is Heart Month: Learn Hands Only CPR to save the life of a loved one

February is Heart Month. Veterans Memorial Hospital is encouraging the public to learn the American Heart Association’s “Hands Only CPR.” This simple way of performing CPR is very easy to do and effective for the victim.

According to the American Heart Association, sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death with nearly 400,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring annually in the United States. An average of 89% of people who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest die because they don’t receive immediate CPR from someone on the scene.

The American Heart Association has found Hands Only CPR to be as effective as conventional CPR for sudden cardiac arrest at home, at work, or in the public - doubling or even tripling a victim’s chance of survival.

Since 80% of cardiac arrests happen in private or residential settings, learn these simple steps for performing Hands Only CPR to help save the life of someone you love:

Wed
14
Feb

Bench donated in memory of Diana Ward ...

Several members of the Diana Ward family presented Veterans Memorial Hospital with this bench in memory of Diana, who was a dedicated LPN at the hospital in Waukon for over 25 years. This bench is located directly inside the main entrance of the hospital and will aid many visitors and patients with a comfortable, sturdy and safe place to wait as they are dropped off or picked up at the main entrance. Pictured, left to right, are: Front row - Diana’s grandchildren, Anastasia, Keaton and Tamara. Back row - Diana’s daughter, Tonia; Diana’s sister, Carole Gehrig, and Diana’s brother, Robert Ward. Submitted photo.
 

Wed
14
Feb

Flu shot still best way to protect against flu

The influenza season is in full swing throughout the country. It’s not too late to get a flu shot. Vaccination now can still provide protection for the remainder of the flu season, which can last as late as May, and is available at Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care. In addition, simple steps like frequent hand washing and not coughing or sneezing on people can help prevent the spread of influenza. Most importantly, anyone who is ill should stay home from work or school.

Flu vaccines are developed each year to protect against the three most common flu viruses expected during the influenza season. No vaccine covers all strains or is guaranteed to match 100 percent of the viruses.

Wed
14
Feb

Heart disease in women, knowing signs saves lives

Tingling hands, aching teeth or jaw, trouble sleeping, cold sweats, nausea/indigestion, fatigue, dizziness, even increased anxiety. Women should know that these could be symptoms of heart attack.

“Symptoms may differ from the classic signs experienced by men such as tightness in the chest, arm pain and shortness of breath,” explains Coley Barbee, MD, family medicine physician at Gundersen Waukon Clinic.

Despite a better understanding of heart disease in women, the statistics are still disheartening:
- Heart disease is the largest cause of death in women.
- Women are two times more likely to die from a heart attack than men.
- There are six times more deaths from heart attacks than from breast cancer and two times more than all cancers combined.

Wed
14
Feb

Get a quick start on better heart health

Since February is American Heart Month it’s a great time to think about the health of one’s heart. “Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women,” says Sara Winters, physician assistant at Mayo Clinic Health System - Franciscan Healthcare in Waukon. “Fortunately, small changes can make a difference when it comes to improving your heart health.”

“If you can go from a sedentary lifestyle to being active for one hour a week, you’ve greatly reduced your risk for heart disease,” shared Winters. “If you’re looking to improve your heart health, try this two-week quick start from the Mayo Clinic Healthy Heart Plan.”

Eat five servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Make a conscious effort to include more fruits and vegetables in meals. Don’t worry so much about the foods that shouldn’t be eaten - just work on getting five or more services of fruits and vegetables a day.

Wed
14
Feb

Flu shot still best way to protect against flu

The influenza season is in full swing throughout the country. It’s not too late to get a flu shot. Vaccination now can still provide protection for the remainder of the flu season, which can last as late as May, and is available at Veterans Memorial Hospital Community and Home Care. In addition, simple steps like frequent hand washing and not coughing or sneezing on people can help prevent the spread of influenza. Most importantly, anyone who is ill should stay home from work or school.

Flu vaccines are developed each year to protect against the three most common flu viruses expected during the influenza season. No vaccine covers all strains or is guaranteed to match 100 percent of the viruses.

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