Agriculture

Wed
30
Mar

ISU Extension answers common questions about Avian Influenza

Biosecurity and producer awareness are top issues

Avian influenza continues to be confirmed across Iowa and the nation. Here are some common questions and answers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach to help inform consumers, bird owners and poultry producers.

Wed
23
Mar

What's Up at the USDA Office?

Upcoming Deadlines/Dates
Mar. 25: Dairy Margin Coverage Program

Manure and Soil Health
by LuAnn Rolling, NRCS District Conservationist
Ruth Blomquist, the Southwest Iowa Soil Health specialist for the NRCS, says she was recently asked  about manure application and soil health. The question was, “Are we doing more harm than good if manure is applied with a high disturbance method like injection or if it is surface applied with incorporation?”  She did some research and found that the answer isn’t a simple yes or no, and it depends on multiple factors.

Wed
23
Mar

Prevent avian influenza by promoting good biosecurity

In a recent episode of the Small Farm Sustainability Podcast, Yuko Sato, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach poultry veterinarian and associate professor in Iowa State’s College of Veterinary Medicine, discusses avian influenza and how good biosecurity practices can help prevent outbreaks in poultry.

Avian influenza, explains Sato, is a viral disease of poultry and other birds caused by type A influenza virus. There are two primary types of the virus, distinguished by their capacity to cause disease. The first, Low-Pathogenic Avian Influenza, results in mild respiratory symptoms. The second, and more concerning, is Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, which spreads rapidly through chicken and turkey populations and has a high fatality rate.

Wed
16
Mar

What's Up at the USDA Office?

Upcoming Deadlines/Dates
Mar. 25: Dairy Margin Coverage Program

Mid-Contract Management (MCM) on CRP Acres
Now that temperatures are starting to feel more like spring, please start thinking about your MCM, if you are scheduled for this year.  Those that are scheduled for this year would have received a packet from our office this past fall detailing what needs to be done.  You do have until May 14, 2022 to complete the work, but now is a good time to start lining up contractors if you haven’t already done so, buy seed if needed, and get equipment ready.  If you have technical questions, need a seeding plan, or contractor list please contact the NRCS office.  Any other questions can be directed to FSA. Once you complete your MCM, notify the FSA office, sign the FSA-848B form, and provide acceptable evidence (receipts, invoices, etc.) of practice completion to determine proper cost share payment.  

Wed
16
Mar

Iowa State University part of study exploring links between health of soils, plants and humans

Iowa State University is part of a new study funded by the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) to explore possible links between soil health, the nutritional value of plants and human health.

The overall goal of the four-year, $1 million project is to investigate how management practices may alter nitrogen-related nutritional content of grains, such as protein, amino acids and B vitamins, and affect indicators of chemical, physical and biological soil health.  

Wed
09
Mar

What's Up at the USDA Office?

Upcoming Deadlines/Dates
Mar. 11: General CRP Signup
Mar. 15: ARCPLC Program Deadline
Mar. 25: Dairy Margin Coverage Program

Is Wasted Hay the Best Way to Build up Fertility?

by LuAnn Rolling, NRCS District Conservationist

We have all heard that unrolling hay and feeding it is a good way to build fertility in poor areas of pastures. While this may be good advice if hay is used efficiently, due to concentrating manure and urine, according to Jim Elizondo from Real Wealth Ranching, some producers have mistaken this for building a fertility program based on wasteful hay feeding.

Wed
09
Mar

Carbon storage and marketing highlighted at Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Nashua

Topics include carbon storage and sequestration

Carbon storage and marketing will highlight the discussion at the annual meeting of the Northeast Iowa Agricultural Experiment Association, to be held March 16 at the Borlaug Learning Center at Iowa State’s Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Nashua.

Speakers include Keith Schilling, state geologist and director, Iowa Geological Survey, University of Iowa, and Ann Johanns, education extension specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

Schilling will discuss “Challenges and Opportunities of Carbon Storage and Sequestration in Midwest Landscapes,” followed by Johanns’ talk, “Carbon Market Options for Producers.”

Wed
09
Mar

Northeast Iowa Dairy and Agriculture Foundation to host Annual Meeting

Join the Northeast Iowa Dairy and Agriculture Foundation for the 2022 Annual Meeting on Thursday, March 24. The meeting will be held at Iowa’s Dairy Center starting at 9:30 a.m. The morning session will feature a variety of speakers discussing environmental stewardship followed by the annual meeting in the afternoon.

Bill Northey, principal at WHNorthey, LLC., and former USDA Under Secretary of Farm Production and Conservation and Iowa Secretary of Agriculture, will discuss the future of conservation and sustainability. Additionally, Adam Kramer, co-founder of Black Sand Granary, will share information on sustaining, enhancing and innovating through stewardship. Finally, Erin Cortus, Associate Professor and Extension Engineer at the University of Minnesota, will share her insights on the science and communication aspects of sustainable dairy production.

The annual meeting will begin at 1 p.m. and will feature the business meeting and election of board members.

Wed
02
Mar

What's Up at the USDA Office?

Upcoming Deadlines/Dates
Mar. 11: General CRP Signup
Mar. 15: ARCPLC Program Deadline
Mar. 25: Dairy Margin Coverage Program

Wed
02
Mar

Ag Secretary Naig invites Iowa families to apply now for the 2022 Century and Heritage Farm Program

Applications will be accepted until June 1, 2022

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig encourages eligible farm owners to apply for the 2022 Century and Heritage Farm Program now. The program was created by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship and the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation to recognize families who have owned their farms for 100 years and 150 years, respectively.

“The Century and Heritage Farm Program recognizes the strength and resiliency of Iowa’s multi-generation farm families,” said Secretary Naig. “I always look forward to celebrating with the families and hearing stories about their incredible farming legacies. I am grateful for the investments they make to protect our rich farmland and their continued commitment to our state’s agriculture community.”

To apply, download the application on the Department’s website at iowaagriculture.gov/century-and-heritage-farm-program.

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