River Valley

Wed
11
Oct

New Albin Fire Department prepares itself for the harvest season with new grain bin rescue tube and training


New Albin Fire Department awarded grain bin rescue tube and training ... Pictured above, members of the New Albin Fire Department stand with the Great Wall grain bin rescue tube the department was awarded in a Grain Bin Safety Week contest earlier this year, along with the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety trainer who educated the department volunteers on its use in September. At right is a simulated training demonstration using the Great Wall grain bin rescue tube. Photos courtesy of Nationwide Insurance.

by Anne Falken

Residents of this area would describe the area in which they live as a farming community, and as harvest begins in earnest this time of year with feelings of accomplishment, many of those residents hold their collective breath, knowing all of its dangers, as well. Large machinery, farmers working many hours and at night, the risks invariably taken in the press of time, and children in the mix, put all on edge.

The New Albin Fire Department demonstrated foresight in its emergency response to the harvest season when department officials entered the “2017 Nominate Your Fire Department Contest” last February, as part of Grain Bin Safety Week. The New Albin department was selected as a winner, from among 883 nominations, of a Great Wall grain rescue tube, or Adaptable Grain Entrapment Rescue System, including training.

Wed
11
Oct

Students and community members hear presentation on technology use and misuse from Criminal Justice professor


Dr. Justin Patchin presented at three different sessions in New Albin and Lansing Monday, September 25 on the use and misuse of technology. His presentations were made possible by the New Albin Community Education program. Submitted photo.

Dr. Justin Patchin, a professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire, was invited by New Albin Community Education to make a presentation to the Eastern Allamakee Community schools and the local community to talk about technology use and misuse September 25. Dr. Patchin gave three presentations that day and all were a little different.

During his presentation at Kee High School, he talked about understanding that when a person puts something on the world wide web, it never goes away, even if it is deleted. He encouraged students to always be aware that what they are posting on Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram or any other social media is available to future employers, present employers or "that stranger" thousands of miles away.

Wed
11
Oct

More history podiums dedicated in Lansing ...

During Lansing's Sesquicentennial celebration and Kee High School's Homecoming weekend September 22-24, five additional history podiums were dedicated throughout the community. Podiums are placed on each block of downtown Main Street describing the opposite side of the street. Two podiums are also on the corner of Front Street and Main Street describing the bridge and south Lansing. Area families' donations, along with funds from the Allamakee County Community Foundation, have made the podiums a reality. More podiums are planned for the future.

Wed
11
Oct

Little Free Library now available in Ferryville, WI ...

This Little Free Library is now available to book lovers for exchanging books in Ferryville, WI. This newest library was made possible by the partnership between the Ferryville Vision and Promotion Board and the 50th anniversary promotion of Southwest Wisconsin Technical College in Fennimore, WI. Submitted photos.
 

Wed
04
Oct

Stone School open to visitors during Homecoming weekend ...

Many people visited the Stone Schoolhouse in Lansing during the weekend of September 22-24 in observance of Lansing's 150th birthday celebration and Homecoming weekend at Kee High School in Lansing. The Stone School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and one room of the school was open for the public to visit. Several class pictures from the late 1800s to the mid 1900s were displayed, as well as some memorabilia from private collections and other historical moments and features of the Lansing community. Photos by Susan Cantine-Maxson.
 

Wed
04
Oct

Annual HawkWatch to be celebrated October 7 at Driftless Wetland Centre

Saturday, October 7, the Driftless Area Wetlands Centre, in partnership with the Upper Iowa Audubon Society, will host HawkWatch.  This event celebrates the fall migration of hundreds of thousands of raptors and other birds along the Mississippi River Flyway.

HawkWatch is a free event, designed to appeal to everyone, including families, amateur birders and raptor enthusiasts. HawkWatch activities will be held at the Driftless Area Wetlands Centre, located at 509 Hwy. 18 in Marquette, a half-mile west of the Marquette-Joliet Bridge on Hwy 18.

Wed
04
Oct

Lansing City Council approves stricter penalties for the illegal usage of City dump, advised of hydrant flushing Wednesday

by Macie Hill

The regular meeting of the Lansing City Council was held Monday, October 2. Discussion centered around a new historical podium being placed within the city, a building permit request, updated fines for illegal disposal at the city dump, the possibility of slightly rusty water and decreased water pressure Wednesday, October 4, a new city police officer position opening, and City Parks board positions being filled.

There will be a new historical podium in honor of Bill Betsinger put in place on North Front Street, just south of the marina. There has been a building permit request made for construction at 390 Dodge Street. The motion was made and seconded to approve the request.

Wed
27
Sep

New pastor at Lansing United Methodist Church answers call to serve he received in a dream


Family of new pastor at Lansing United Methodist Church ... Left to right - Front row: Rebecca and Davinia. Back row: Mado, Marcellina and Pastor Sedar Wembonyama. Photo by Susan Cantine-Maxson.

by Susan Cantine-Maxson

Lansing’s United Methodist Church recently welcomed a new minister and his family to their parish. Pastor Sedar Wembonyama and his family bring a new dimension to worship to the congregation because they have spent most of their life in the Congo in Africa.

Marcellina, the pastor’s wife, currently drives to Postville to work but would love to find something closer to home. The three daughters, Mado, Rebecca and Davinia all attend Eastern Allamakee schools.

Four years ago, they immigrated to the United States to Nashua, where they stayed with a friend who was a minister. For the first time, they experienced snow and Iowa winters. Marcellina liked snow but not driving in it, and the girls enjoyed playing in it.

Wed
27
Sep

Lansing Lions Club Playground Project nearing completion, finishing touches yet to be added before playground opens ...

The Lansing Lions Club Playground Project took a giant step forward this past weekend as more than 35 volunteers assisted with the installation of the facsimile of a Mississippi River Steamboat playground structure (pictured in progress below). The balance of the equipment is expected to arrive this Friday morning and by noon this Saturday the equipment, itself, should be installed. Further completion activity will include the need to place the 12-inch layer of wood chip base, benches, bicycle rack, sidewalks and a base for the handicap accessible picnic table under the playground shelter, and then the playground will reopen. Residents and visitors are asked to be patient and not cross the orange barrier fencing around the project which is in place for protection until the installation is complete.

Wed
27
Sep

Lansing is branching out with new trees from Trees Forever and Alliant Energy

Volunteers and community leaders are taking an active role in saving energy and adding beauty to Lansing by planting new trees. The local effort is part of the Branching Out program offered by Trees Forever and Alliant Energy.

"We're looking forward to working with tree experts at Trees Forever and the energy experts at Alliant Energy to make our community healthier, more vibrant and more energy efficient," said local project volunteer Stephanie Runkle.

Planting trees can reduce energy use by creating shade that cools the air and buildings, and by blocking cold winds. Trees also provide long-term health, economic, social and environmental benefits to the community.

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