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Wed
07
Feb

Birth announcement: Sommer

Dacia and Jason Sommer of Waukon announce the birth of their daughter, Dreya Judith Sommer, born January 24, 2018 at Gundersen Health System in La Crosse, WI. She weighed 6 lbs. 10 ozs. and measured 18-3/4 inches in length at the time of her birth. She joins siblings, Trinity (13), Mataya (12), Aydrik (7) and Kroy (1).

Grandparents are Lloyd and Betty Welsh of Lansing and Jerry and Judy Sommer of Waukon.

Wed
07
Feb

Birth announcement: Rauk

Ashley and Josh Rauk of Decorah announce the birth of their daughter, Hayden Rauk, born January 26, 2018 at Veterans Memorial Hospital in Waukon. She weighed 8 lbs. 5 ozs. and measured 20 inches in length at the time of her birth. She joins a sister, Blakelyn (4).

Grandparents are Sandra Mitchell and Greg O’Brien, Lynne Bullerman, Richard Rauk, Galynn and Jill Mitchell and Wayne and Lisa Gilster. Great-grandparents are Annette Emery, Ruth Mitchell, Judy and Norbert Bullerman, Marylou Rauk and Darlene Gilster.
 

Wed
07
Feb

What's up at the FSA Office?

by Jeremy Leitz, Allamakee County Executive Director (563) 568-2148

Upcoming Deadlines and Important Dates
• February 19: Office closed in observance of George Washington’s Birthday

February 2018 CCC and FSFL Interest Rates
New rates were issued for the month of February and are as follows:
• 2.125% for 3 years
• 2.250% for 5 years
• 2.375% for 7 years
• 2.375% for 10 years
• 2.500% for 12 years
• 2.625% for 15 years

Marketing Assistance Loans
The February commodity interest rate is 2.750%. The 2017 marketing assistance loan rates are $1.87 for corn, and $4.99 for beans. If you do take out a marketing assistance loan with us, we will need a copy of your driver’s license, as well as your spouse’s. 

Wed
07
Feb

Producers reminded to consider the consequences of crop residue removal

by LuAnn Rolling,
District Conservationist

Removal of crop residue should be weighed against the potential impact on soil productivity. Crop residue removal affects soil nutrient availability, soil organic matter, erosion potential, soil water availability, yield and economics. While crop residue removal by grazing usually results in little nutrient or organic material removal, mechanical harvest removes nutrients and organic material critical to maintaining soil productivity.

How much corn residue can be safely removed from a field? This is not an easy question to answer. Sustainable crop residue removal rates depend on several factors such as soil erodibility, surface slope, cultural practices and climate conditions. Tillage, crop rotation and yield level are also important factors dictating how much crop residue can be harvested and still ensure sustainability of the system.

Wed
07
Feb

Iowa State University researchers feature latest science on damaging nematodes

A tiny worm that causes billions of dollars in damage to crops like soybeans will be in the scientific spotlight this month thanks to an article written by two Iowa State University plant pathologists.

The latest knowledge on how cyst nematodes attack plants was the lead article in PLOS Pathogens Pearls, a journal of the nonprofit open access science, technology and medicine publisher.

Wed
07
Feb

And then I wrote...

by Dick Schilling, "Editor Emeritus"

... that since I have been retired for nearly 20 years from daily association with the profession, I feel the freedom to be critical of the written press from time to time.

One of the first things we were taught in J-school was to be careful not to bury the lede. That is, the most important things that happened at a meeting or in an event should appear in the first paragraph, answering as many of the who, what, when, where and why quintet as possible.

Tiger Woods played in a golf tournament in La Jolla, CA, his first action in some time. He finished well behind the leaders, maybe 28th or so. The Gazette Sunday printed a 15-paragraph story from Reuters news service, all about Tiger, and it wasn’t until that final paragraph that it was noted there was a playoff among three golfers for the tournament championship. The Register ran an eight paragraph article which mentioned nobody but Woods.

Wed
07
Feb

Letter to the Editor: We are the problem

To the Editor:

We are the Problem

Wed
07
Feb

Word for Word 2/7/18

Rev. Samantha Houser
Rev. Samantha Houser

It’s been a month since the New Year has rolled in and if you are like most people around the world who celebrated, you made some sort of resolution to bring in 2018.  But now that we are ALL the way into February you may have realized (like most people) that New Year’s Resolutions are often tricky.

Full of optimism and hope at the turn of a new leaf, we can enthusiastically set goals and hopes that are really tough or even unrealistic. Which is great if you’re the kind of person who, as Norman Vincent Peale famously said, are happy to “Shoot for the moon. Even if you fail, you’ll land among the stars.”

But if landing among the stars leads to feelings of deep failure for you, then maybe a gentler approach would be helpful.

Wed
07
Feb

Letter to the Editor: Patriotism

To the Editor:

When President Obama gave his State of the Union Address, a group of Republicans boycotted. Now, Donald Trump gives his State of the Union Address and a few Democrats boycott.

A contingent of high-salaried pro athletes boycott our National Anthem. They have hats that read “Make America Great Again” which were made in China.

Through it all, I still believe in God Bless America, Land of the Free and Home of the Brave.

Still proud of what God gave me,

Paul R. Melsha
Harpers Ferry

 

Wed
07
Feb

Letter to the Editor: Senate File 2091: Impact on public education in rural schools

To the Editor:

I would like to call your attention to the dangers of a bill that could move our local schools to consolidate in the near future. If a few students are removed from each grade level, our local schools’ budget could not tolerate the loss of those dollars. This bill would devastate our rural schools by handing out taxpayer-funded debit cards to parents with little or no accountability.

The bill would pay $6600 of your hard-earned tax-dollars to each student who is enrolled in a nonpublic school or homeschooled. The money would be placed in an account that parents could access with a debit card. According to the bill, parents could spend your tax dollars on anything that is considered “materials for a course of study for a specific subject matter or grade level.”

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