Viewpoints

Wed
04
Oct

Wexford Wanderings

by Hugh E. Conway

Games 5

Like other Iowans, early settlers in northeast Iowa believed that everyone would gain from some education. To function properly in society and play a role in the future in this county, children should learn how to read and to write. Early on, often one room schoolhouses in the Wexford area were where basic skills were taught to both boys and girls. Over 12,000 of these little structures once dotted Iowa’s landscapes. Recess was some of the fun times where children could use their imagination and play games and in the process also gain life skills.

Another fun game of rounds that was played in Wexford schools was Muffin Man. The game starts with one child turning to the next child and singing the verse:

Do you know the muffin man? “The muffin man, the muffin man” Do you know the muffin man who lives on Drury Lane?

Wed
27
Sep

And then I wrote...

by Dick Schilling, "Editor Emeritus"

... that a couple weeks ago, as the world was noting the anniversary of the death of Princess Diana, I was starting a book, a biographical account, of the life of her ancestor, Georgiana, the Duchess of Devonshire. She was a (insert four greats) aunt of Diana’s from the Spencer family. Earl Spencer was the father of Diana, who became the Princess of Wales upon her marriage. Which shows how convoluted British royalty is, because the Prince of Wales of her time, in the late 1770s, was a sometimes cohort of Georgiana’s, the late Diana left a Prince of Wales as an heir.

I’m confused already, and have just started. Georgiana’s life obviously included the time when the United States of America removed itself from the British Empire.

Wed
27
Sep

Letter to the Editor: Get your walk on in Waukon October 4

To the Editor:

Seven years ago, the Iowa Healthiest State Initiative launched the “start somewhere” walk as an opportunity to engage Iowans to join us in making Iowa the healthiest state in the nation. Since 2011, hundreds of thousands of Iowans have walked on the first Wednesday of October and we’ve seen a growing increase in making Iowa communities more walkable. Communities are adopting complete street policies, hiring staff dedicated to incorporating walking, biking and transit in transportation plans and launching walking school buses so kids can walk or bike safely to school.

This year the Healthiest State is reminding Iowans to care for their own health by walking every day by kicking off the Walk more. Connect more campaign in partnership with the Walk more. Connect more. NE Iowa.
On October 4 we are challenging Iowans to “get your walk on” in Waukon, and join the walk hosted at Noon that day, by Veterans Memorial Hospital.  

Wed
27
Sep

Letter to the Editor: I am a Socialist

To the Editor:

I’m a socialist. I don’t want free things. I want to pay for things in a different way and to live in a country based on morality and equity. I’m a socialist. I don’t want free things. I want to pay for things in a different way and to live in a country based on morality and equity. I’m a socialist. I don’t want free things. I want to pay for things in a different way and to live in a country based on morality and equity. I’m a socialist. I don’t want free things. I want to pay for things in a different way and to live in a country based on morality and equity. Maybe if I write those sentences four times Mr. Engle will be able to actually understand what I write.

Wed
27
Sep

Letter to the Editor: Community and regional development

To the Editor:

Community. Ultimately, this word defines all of our rural towns and cities. A gathering place consecrated with decades of shared struggles, hard work, and celebrated success. Yet despite many great advances towards cooperation, we have a long way to go to truly reach community in our region.

As an economic developer, it is my privilege to visit our cities and to work for a brighter future. We have many awesome businesses and dedicated people in our cities, as you are well aware. Each city in our region has high hopes for future success. But that future requires collaboration. It requires community.

This region was built upon the belief that we all thrive when we work together. The shared joy when a community park was developed, the shared grief when a local restaurant suffered a fire. But more than anything else, this region has known success when its communities collaborated with each other, and triumphed over reliance on the self and state.

Wed
27
Sep

Letter to the Editor: Thankful to farmers for abundant choices

To the Editor:

I am a mom, consumer and farm wife from Monona. Each week I make my way to the grocery store to pick up groceries for my family. This is a task I take pride in, but not one that I view as simple. Each week I am faced with a list a mile long and hundreds of options to choose from. This is a good thing, and one which leads me to say, “thank you, Iowa farmers!”

I am thankful for the ability to choose from a variety of products. I am thankful that farmers, like my husband, choose to implement different practices on their farms, raise different products, and utilize different technology, because that diversity assures choices for us all at the grocery store.

Wed
20
Sep

And then I wrote...

by Dick Schilling, "Editor Emeritus"

... that there is an old adage to the effect that you should be careful what you wish for because it might happen.

For days I wished that television would cover something else besides the hurricane headed for Florida. The networks and weather channel sent reporters out into the worst weather conditions they could find, and they would stand there leaning into the wind in drenching rain and tell us what we could see, which they could have done just as well from inside the window they were just outside of.

And the predictions were dire, and it was (is) very bad, but one called it a rainfall “of Biblical proportions.” Presumably meaning that episode of Noah and his arc. Before man’s industrial revolution caused climate change, by the way!

Wed
20
Sep

Letter to the Editor: Socialism does not work any better than the Progressive movement

To the Editor:

In his letter of September 6, Jacob Galema has a couple of things right. We need to reduce/eliminate waste and fraud in the government.  And we need to end corporate welfare. On everything else he is wrong.

His plea to support his “dude Bernie” requires that you give up the notion of self reliance and self determination and let the government take care of you. That is not what made America great and it will certainly do nothing to improve it.

I am not willing to give the government any more power at the expensive of individual freedom. I will continue to promote that as long as I can take a breath. We do not need any more power handed over to the government.

Wed
20
Sep

Letter to the Editor: That time of year again

To the Editor:

Once again, it seems that roads are becoming very busy with farm equipment. It is the season when ag equipment will be traveling area roads more frequently, as local farmers begin to harvest the crops.

So, as you drive to work or are just on a weekend road trip, please take extra caution and pay attention for farm equipment. They are only traveling at one-third to half the speed of most vehicles on the road.

Here are some tips to keep you and them safe on the roads. Pay attention to their flashing amber lights, these are their way of telling you they are slower than you and also which direction they are possibly going to be turning for a driveway. If you pass on the highway, be courteous and move over and do it in a marked passing zone because it is the law, even if you’re just passing a tractor! 

Wed
13
Sep

And then I wrote...

by Dick Schilling, "Editor Emeritus"

... that I have noted here before that the way a newspaper or television reporter feels about a story often indicates how that story will be treated.

A case in point is the effort by Iowa’s largest newspaper to make it appear the city of Waukee will cut a check for $213 million to Apple so Apple will locate a data center there.

Apple has said there will be 50 people employed at the center so opponents have done the math so it appears it will cost the city over $4 million per job.

Played down is the fact the city will actually be paying nothing to Apple. Instead, the city will “forgive” a portion of property taxes on the site for 20 years. It will collect $76 million in property taxes during that period.

What would the city get if Apple doesn’t build? Perhaps nothing. What if some other use is made of the property? Who knows?

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