Viewpoints

Wed
14
Jun

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Stacie Speirs, Northeast Iowa Area Agency on Aging (NEI3A) Regional Coordinator

To the Editor:

June 15, 2023 is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. Northeast Iowa Area Agency on Aging is proud to join communities in the USA and all over the world to help raise awareness of this systemic social challenge.

As Americans, we believe in justice for all. Yet we fail to live up to this promise when we allow older members of our society to be abused or neglected. Older people are vital contributing members of American society, and their maltreatment diminishes all of us. Just as we have confronted and addressed the social issues of child abuse and domestic violence, so too can we find solutions to address issues like elder abuse, which also threatens the well-being of our community.

Wed
31
May

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Mark Jacobson

To the Editor:

During the last few years there has been an amazing shift in the world of mental health. People have begun to understand that the mental health issues that someone may struggle with do not define them, and that they need support and love from their family and peers.

The stigma that once hung over depression, anxiety and other mental disorders is lifting, making it easier for people to come to terms with their illnesses and seek the help they need to heal. An extremely beneficial way to combat mental illness is to attend peer support groups for mental health. Here is a list from clinical psychologist David Susman, PhD of six reasons a support group could best serve your needs.

Wed
24
May

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by David Jacobson

To the Editor:

Trump and his supporters in attendance exhibited a new low at the New Hampshire town hall telecast by CNN this past week.  Trump was found guilty of sexual abuse and defamation by a New York district judge and jury of his peers, per the requirements of the U.S. Constitution. Trump lied to millions of people on the telecast stating he didn’t know E. Jean Carroll, called her a “wack job”, the verdict a disgrace and a continuing “witch hunt”.

Wed
24
May

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Leigh Rekow

To the Editor:

Recently my wife and I went to Waukon to renew our drivers licenses. I had heard appointments were no longer needed. Not true in Waukon. We were told we couldn’t be served without an appointment, and they are going to keep it that way.

To me, it feels like more power over the people. I thought our county officials were there to serve the people. In my opinion, the time spent taking phone reservations and keeping a log could be better spent just doing the job.

I called the Elkader drivers license office and they said welcome, walk right in. They were the nicest people and the service was quick. We left feeling great. The Elkader office is on Gunder Road in the Supervisors building across from the Elkader Golf Course.

Leigh Rekow
Postville

 

Wed
24
May

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Jim Magner

To the Editor:

The saying “old is often considered obsolete” bears little fruit and is not only costly to the environment but also to the taxpayer. A prime example of contradicting that saying was an excellent event and showcase of young people in action in the production of the classic musical “Grease” held in the old Waterville High School gym a couple weekends ago.

It not only was entertaining with great, enthusiastic energy and drive, but it was performed under the same roof as the famed Waterville High School girls basketball team played under 60-70 years ago. This was an excellent example of how repurposing is supposed to work.

The old Waterville School District, the mayor, the city council and involved area residents should all be commended and applauded for their work and foresight in preserving and repurposing such a fine, solid rural facility. This may well be another hidden gem in the driftless area of tourist attractions.

Wed
17
May

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Arthur Clocksin

To the Editor:
In the Word for Word column in the May 3 edition of The Standard, Pastor Laura Gentry talks about how it is growing season, both in our gardens and in our spiritual lives. She discusses the deep concept of how to grow spiritually by mentioning four simple steps: dive into the word, sing the songs, live the life, and tell the story.

Sometimes we tend to make our spiritual journey too complicated as we seek to draw nearer to God. We can put the burden on ourselves and be bound down by legalism, or in our self-righteousness we can cause others to feel bad about themselves.

Religious people have been heard to say, “I don’t smoke, drink, chew, or go with those who do.” That is fine for those who have conquered such habits, but what about those who are still bound by these habits; how does such a self-righteous comment make those people feel?

Wed
17
May

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Karen Pratte

To the Editor:
Iowans are good people with common sense and compassion who care about one another. They value their public schools which are the hub of rural communities. They want to drink clean water and they want a government which works for them.

When Iowans voted, did they ask for their public schools to be starved and weakened?

Did they want to make it harder for the hungry to be fed?

Did they ask for  books to be banned and the teaching of Black and Native American history suppressed?

Did they want facts about Iowa’s dirty, polluted water to be hidden and ignored?

Did they want the governor, who favors corporations and wealthy donors,  to have more power?

Did they ask for waste, fraud and abuse of public money to be concealed?

The Iowans I know would answer “no” to each of these questions.

Wed
10
May

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Wendy Schutte

To the Editor:

The Supreme Court is run amok, and it’s time to get it under control.

For the last year, we have witnessed scandal after scandal come out of the Supreme Court. From learning that Samuel Alito may have leaked a decision about reproductive health to conservative anti-abortion activists, to discovering Clarence Thomas has been secretly accepting luxury vacations from a GOP megadonor for twenty years, the actions of these justices on the highest court in the land are unconscionable.

Thankfully, this bad behavior can be addressed. Congress has the ability - and responsibility - to act as a check on the Supreme Court and restore faith in our judicial system. It’s time they take the first step and pass a code of ethics for the Supreme Court.

No one is above accountability, and that includes our justices on the Supreme Court.

Sincerely,
Wendy Schutte
Harpers Ferry

Wed
10
May

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Katie Dodge Hanson

To the Editor:

Iowans are compassionate people and share the belief that people who have been victims of crimes should receive support and assistance. Most would agree that rape is one of the crimes that certainly necessitates comprehensive services to victims.

Victims of rape have an acute need for timely access to health services as soon as possible after a violent assault, including emergency contraception to prevent an unintended pregnancy from occurring. Making sure victims have access to this care is good public policy and consistent with medical ethics and standard of care.

Costs for this, and the forensic examinations provided to victims of rape and sexual assault, are funded by the state’s victim compensation fund, which is administered by the attorney general’s Crime Victims Assistance Division. Dollars for the victim compensation fund come from fines and penalties paid by offenders and no taxpayer dollars are used for the fund.

Wed
10
May

Letter to the Editor: Submitted by Karen Carlton

To the Editor:

When dairy farmers want to know if they are feeding the optimal rations, they will monitor the amount of milk any one cow is producing. If adjustments are needed, obviously they would make them.

If a person goes to the doctor with an illness, the doctor will want to monitor whether the medicine given was working or not and make necessary adjustments. When a businessperson wants to check if they’re on the right track to grow their business, they will look at the data and trends.

Protecting and growing one’s resources requires monitoring and accurate information. Ignoring facts and data won’t fix any problems.

This is why I am really puzzled as to why the Iowa House and Senate Republicans decided to defund the water quality sensors around the state. These sensors provided 24/7 monitoring of many creeks and rivers.

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